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[New eBook] Download The No-Nonsense Guide to In-App Ads

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 21:23

Originally Posted on Inside AdMob Blog


Posted by Joe Salisbury, Product Specialist, AdMob
A clear trend is emerging in the world of smartphones – people want free apps. According to a study by Juniper Research, barely 1% of apps are now paid for at the point of download.1

While demand for free apps continues to increase, app developers are answering a very important question, “what’s the best way to publish my app for free while sustainably funding my business?”

In-app ads are a reliable solution that is set to grow 3.2X between 2014-18. 2

Many of the world’s most popular apps rely heavily on in-app advertising to earn income. Apps like PicsArts and Trivia Crack each have hundreds of millions of downloads and use advertising as a revenue source. In-app ads are evolving and there are many options for developers to utilize which provide great experiences for users.

So, how do you get started with ads?

To answer this, we’re launching a new ebook called “The No-nonsense Guide to In-App Ads”, the latest in our No-nonsense series. This guide is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of in-app advertising for those new to the opportunity. We’ll walk you through how digital ads can be included into your app strategy and what’s the best way for you to get started.

In the eBook, you’ll learn:

  • Foundational advertising concepts like eCPM, Fill Rate, Demand, and Inventory.
  • A simple overview of how businesses make money from advertising. 
  • How Pay Per Click advertising works.
  • A basic explanation of ad networks and how they can help you monetize your app.
  • How to choose the right ad network for your app.

Download a free copy here.


For more tips on app monetization, be sure to stay connected on all things AdMob by following our Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ pages.

Posted by Joe Salisbury, Product Specialist, AdMob

1 - Juniper, April 2015 and Juniper website, The App Landscape Today, Feb 2015
2 - App Annie/IDC, April 2015, Mobile App Advertising and Monetization Trends 2013-2018
Categories: Programming

Saying goodbye to OAuth 1.0 (2LO)

Fri, 04/22/2016 - 17:00

Originally posted on Google Apps Developers Blog

Posted by Vartika Agarwal, Technical Program Manager, Identity & Authentication, and Wesley Chun, Developer Advocate, Google

As we indicated several years ago, we are moving away from the OAuth 1.0 protocol in order to focus our support on the current OAuth standard, OAuth 2.0, which increases security and reduces complexity for developers. OAuth 1.0 (3LO)1 was shut down on April 20, 2015. During this final phase, we will be shutting down OAuth 1.0 (2LO) on October 20, 2016. The easiest way to migrate to the new standard is to use OAuth 2.0 service accounts with domain-wide delegation.

If the migration for applications using these deprecated protocols is not completed before the deadline, those applications will experience an outage in their ability to connect with Google, possibly including the ability to sign-in, until the migration to a supported protocol occurs. To avoid any interruptions in service for your end-users, it is critical that you work to migrate your application(s) prior to the shutdown date.

With this step, we continue to move away from legacy authentication/authorization protocols, focusing our support on modern open standards that enhance the security of Google accounts and that are generally easier for developers to integrate with. If you have any technical questions about migrating your application, please post them to Stack Overflow under the tag google-oauth.

1 3LO stands for 3-legged OAuth: there's an end-user that provides consent. In contrast, 2-legged (2LO) doesn’t involve an end-user and corresponds to enterprise authorization scenarios such as enforcing organization-wide policy control access.

Categories: Programming

Start planning your Google I/O 2016 schedule

Thu, 04/21/2016 - 19:00

Posted by Mike Pegg, Google Developers Team

What are the best ways to optimize battery and memory usage of your apps? How do you create a great app experience that is accessible to everyone, including users with disabilities? How do you build an offline-ready, service-working, app-manifesting, production-ready Progressive Web App using Firebase Hosting? And what are some of the best desserts that start with N? Tune in to Google I/O to get the answers to all of these questions (well, most of them...), along with a whole lot more. You can start planning your schedule now, as the first wave of 100 technical talks just went live at google.com/io!

Last year, you told us you wanted more: more technical content, more time, more space, more everything! We heard your feedback loud and clear and have added a full third day onto Google I/O to accommodate more comprehensive talks in larger spaces than in previous years. These talks will be spread over 14 suggested tracks, including Android, the Mobile Web, Play and more, to help you easily navigate your I/O experience. Of course, we’re also bringing back Codelabs, our self-paced workshops with Googlers nearby to give you a hand.

Attending Remotely?

There are already over 200 I/O Extended events happening around the world. Join one of these events to participate in I/O from your local neighborhood alongside local developers who share the same passion for Google technology. You can also follow the festival from home; we’ll have four different live stream channels to chose from, broadcasting many of the sessions in real time from Shoreline. All of the sessions will be available to watch on YouTube after I/O concludes, in case you miss one.

See you soon!

This is just the first wave of talks. We’ll be adding more talks and events as we get closer to I/O, including a number of talks directly after the keynote (shhhh!! We’ve got some new things to share). We look forward to seeing you in a few weeks -- whether it be in person at Shoreline, at an I/O Extended event, or on I/O Live!

Categories: Programming

Experience virtual reality art in your browser

Tue, 04/19/2016 - 19:55

Posted by Jeff Nusz, Data Arts Team, Pixel Painter

Two weeks ago, we introduced Tilt Brush, a new app that enables artists to use virtual reality to paint the 3D space around them. Part virtual reality, part physical reality, it can be difficult to describe how it feels without trying it firsthand. Today, we bring you a little closer to the experience of painting with Tilt Brush using the powers of the web in a new Chrome Experiment titled Virtual Art Sessions.

Virtual Art Sessions lets you observe six world-renowned artists as they develop blank canvases into beautiful works of art using Tilt Brush. Each session can be explored from start to finish from any angle, including the artist’s perspective – all viewable right from the browser.

Participating artists include illustrator Christoph Niemann, fashion illustrator Katie Rodgers, sculptor Andrea Blasich, installation artist Seung Yul Oh, automotive concept designer Harald Belker, and street artist duo Sheryo & Yok. The artists’ unique approaches to this new medium become apparent when seeing them work inside their Tilt Brush creations. Watch this behind-the-scenes video to hear what the artists had to say about their experience:


Virtual Art Sessions makes use of Google Chrome’s V8 Javascript engine for high-performance processing power to render large volumes of data in real time. This includes point cloud data of the artist’s physical form, 3D geometry data of the artwork, and position data of the VR controllers. It also relies on Chrome’s support of WebM video and WebGL to produce the 360° representations of the artists and artwork – the artist portrayals alone require the browser to draw over 200,000 points at 30 times a second. For a deeper look, read the technical case study or browse the project code that is available open source from the site’s tech page.

We hope this experiment provides a window into the world of painting in virtual reality using Tilt Brush. We are excited by this new medium and hope the experience leaves you feeling the same. Visit g.co/VirtualArtSessions to start exploring.

Categories: Programming

Learn about Android Development Patterns over Coffee with Joanna Smith

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 19:25

Posted by Laurence Moroney, developer advocate

One of the great benefits of Android development is in the flexibility provided by the sheer number of APIs available in the framework, support libraries, Google Play services and elsewhere. While variety is the spice of life, it can lead to some tough decisions when developing -- and good guidance about repeatable patterns for development tasks is always welcome!

With that in mind, Joanna Smith and Ian Lake started Android Development Patterns to help developers not just know how to use an API but also which APIs to choose to begin with.

You can learn more about Android Development Patterns by watching the videos on YouTube, reading this blog post, or checking out the Google Developers page on Medium.

Categories: Programming

Travel through space with the Project Tango app, Solar Simulator

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 22:12

Posted by Jason Guo, Developer Programs Engineer, Project Tango

Since most of us haven’t been to space, it’s often hard to grasp concepts like the vastness of the Solar System or the size of the planets. To make these concepts more tangible, three graduate students at San Francisco State University (SFSU)--Jason Burmark, Moses Lee and Omar Shaikh--have created Solar Simulator, a new app for Project Tango. The app lets people take a virtual walk through space to understand the size and scale of our solar system.

Created with the Unity SDK, the application lays out our solar system’s planets in their relative distances from each other and draws 3D models of them in their relative sizes. The app leverages Project Tango’s motion-tracking API to track your movements as you walk, so you can better understand the planets and their distance in space.

If you like what you see, you can create your own solar system at home. Just follow the six steps below:

  1. Download the Tango Unity SDK.
  2. Create a new Unity project and import the Tango SDK package into the project. If you don’t already have the Tango SDK, you can download it here.
  3. Assuming that you are building a solar simulation, place a sphere at (0, 0, 2) to simulate a planet floating in space. The screen will look like this:
  4. Next, replace the Main Camera with the Tango AR Camera and connect the Tango Manager through the prefabs. To do this, first remove the Main Camera gameobject from the scene. Then drag in the Tango AR Camera and Tango Manager from the TangoPrefabs folder under Project. The scene hierarchy will look like this:
  5. On Tango Manage gameobject, there are several Tango startup configurations such as knobs to configure how Tango will run in the application session, i.e, turning on/off depth, or motion tracking. In this case, check the boxes to turn Auto-connect to service, Enable motion tracking (with Auto Reset), and Enable video overlay (with TextureID method).
  6. To get your code ready for AR on a Tango-enabled device, build and run the project. To do this, follow the “Change the Build Settings” and “Build and run” sections in this tutorial.

Here is what the final scene should look like from the device:

If you want a guided tour of the planets with Solar Simulator, developers Jason, Moses, and Omar will be demoing their app at San Francisco’s California Academy of Sciences’ NightLife tonight at 6:30PM PT. You can also download Solar Simulator on your Project Tango Development Kit.

Categories: Programming

Growing Eddystone with Ephemeral Identifiers: A Privacy Aware & Secure Open Beacon Format

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 16:01

Posted by Nirdhar Khazanie, Product Manager and Yossi Matias, VP Engineering


Last July, we launched Eddystone, an open and extensible Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacon format from Google, supported by Android, iOS, and Chrome. Beacons mark important places and objects in a way that your phone can understand. To do this, they typically broadcast public one-way signals ‒ such as an Eddystone-UID or -URL.

Today, we're introducing Ephemeral IDs (EID), a beacon frame in the Eddystone format that gives developers more power to control who can make use of the beacon signal. Eddystone-EID enables a new set of use cases where it is important for users to be able to exchange information securely and privately. Since the beacon frame changes periodically, the signal is only useful to clients with access to a resolution service that maps the beacon’s current identifier to stable data. In other words, the signal is only recognizable to a controlled set of users. In this post we’ll provide a bit more detail about this feature, as well as Google’s implementation of Eddystone-EID with Google Cloud Platform’s Proximity Beacon API and the Nearby API for Android and CocoaPod for iOS.

Technical Specifications

To an observer of an Eddystone-EID beacon, the AES-encrypted eight byte beacon identifier changes pseudo-randomly with an average period that is set by the developer ‒ over a range from 1 second to just over 9 hours. The identifier is generated using a key and timer running on the beacon. When the beacon is provisioned, or set up, the key is generated and exchanged with a resolution service such as Proximity Beacon API using an Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman key agreement protocol, and the timer is synchronized with the service. This way, only the beacon and the service that it is registered with have access to the key. You can read more about the technical details of Eddystone-EID from the specification ‒ including the provisioning process ‒ on GitHub, or from our recent preprint.

An Eddystone-EID contains measures designed to prevent a variety of nuanced attacks. For example, the rotation period for a single beacon varies slightly from identifier to identifier, meaning that an attacker cannot use a consistent period to identify a particular beacon. Eddystone-EID also enables safety features such as proximity awareness, device authentication, and data encryption on packet transmission. The Eddystone-TLM frame has also been extended with a new version that broadcasts battery level also encrypted with the shared key, meaning that an attacker cannot use the battery level as an identifying feature either.

When correctly implemented and combined with a service that supports a range of access control checks, such as Proximity Beacon API, this pattern has several advantages:
  • The beacon’s location cannot be spoofed, except by a real-time relay of the beacon signal. This makes it ideal for use cases where a developer wishes to enable premium features for a user at a location.
  • Beacons provide a high-quality and precise location signal that is valuable to the deployer. Eddystone-EID enables deployers to decide which developers/businesses can make use of that signal.
  • Eddystone-EID beacons can be integrated into devices that users carry with them without leaving users vulnerable to tracking.
Integrating Seamlessly with the Google Beacon Platform

Launching today on Android and iOS, is a new addition to the wider Google beacon platform: Beacon Tools. Beacon Tools allows you to provision and register an Eddystone-EID beacon, as well as associate content with your beacon through the Google Cloud Platform.

In addition to Eddystone-EID and the new encrypted version of the previously available Eddystone-TLM, we’re also adding a common configuration protocol to the Eddystone family. The Eddystone GATT service allows any Eddystone beacon to be provisioned by any tool that supports the protocol. This encourages the development of an open ecosystem of beacon products, both in hardware and software, removing restrictions for developers.

Eddystone-EID Support in the Beacon Industry

We’re excited to have worked with a variety of industry players as Eddystone-EID develops. Over the past year, Eddystone manufacturers in the beacon space have grown from 5 to over 25. The following 15 manufacturers will be supporting Eddystone-EID, with more to follow:

Accent Systems Bluvision Reco/Perples Beacon Inside Estimote Sensoro Blesh Gimbal Signal360 BlueBite Nordic Swirl Bluecats Radius Networks Zebra


In addition to beacon manufacturers, we’ve been working with a range of innovative companies to demonstrate Eddystone-EID in a variety of different scenarios.
  • Samsonite and Accent Systems have developed a suitcase with Eddystone-EID where users can securely keep track of their personal luggage.
  • K11 is a Hong Kong museum and retail experience using Sensoro Eddystone-EID beacons for visitor tours and customer promotions.
  • Monumental Sports in Washington, DC, uses Radius Networks Eddystone-EID beacons for delivering customer rewards during Washington Wizards and Capitals sporting events.
  • Sparta Digital has produced an app called Buzzin that uses Eddystone-EID beacons deployed in Manchester, UK to enable a more seamless transit experience.
You can get started with Eddystone-EID by creating a Google Cloud Platform project and purchasing compatible hardware through one of our manufacturers. Best of all, Eddystone-EID works transparently to beacon subscriptions created through the Google Play Services Nearby Messages API, allowing you to run combined networks of Eddystone-EID and Eddystone-UID transparently in your client code!
Categories: Programming

Android N and Coffee with Googler Ian Lake

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 22:26

Posted by Laurence Moroney, Developer Advocate

In this episode of Coffee with a Googler, Laurence Moroney meets with Ian Lake to talk about some of the new features in Android N, including updates to Doze, giving greater power savings, and expanding on what was available in Android 6.0 Marshmallow.

They also discuss how the multi-window support works in Android N, and what’s needed to prepare for it to ensure the best integration. Check out the video to see the entire conversation, including discussion on the new notifications in Android N. Learn more at developer.android.com/preview.

Categories: Programming

App Monetization Insights: How MobiSystems adapted their way to success

Thu, 03/31/2016 - 23:06

Originally posted on the AdMob blog

Posted by Joe Salisbury, Product Specialist, AdMob
This is post 4 of our 5-part blog series featuring monetization tips straight from successful app developers. If you’re interested in further exploring the question, “what’s the best way to monetize my app?”, check out our free No-nonsense Guide to App Monetization.

Our guest this week is Elitza Bratkova, Director Business Development at MobiSystems, the company behind a few of the most popular business and productivity apps on Google Play.  Their flagship product, OfficeSuite, is a successful mobile office solution for Android with a user base of over 200M download and preloaded users.

A clear company value surfaced as a big part of MobiSystem’s success – flexibility. Check out ways you can also use flexibility to your advantage with these tips:


1. Adapt quickly to promising platforms and opportunities.

MobiSytems started over 10 years ago. In its early days, they created dictionaries for the most popular platforms – PalmOS and Pocket PC. When a new platform popped up called Symbian, they were quick to build for it, with some success.

Then Android came along in 2007, and Elitza saw the opportunity, despite the business being resource constrained.

“It was clear that mobile devices were becoming more popular for working professionals. The trend was clear. While we did opt-out of building for smaller platforms, this opportunity was in line with our vision and it seemed promising. It seemed like a platform where our target users would be. It was a risk, but we took it.”
The risk paid off. Being one of the earliests apps on the Google Play Store, and being pre-loaded on thousands of devices helped boost MobiSystems presence. Android as a platform significantly grew, expanding the user base that MobiSystems had access to.

MobiSystem’s most recent analysis of their target audience revealed that 15-20% of their users have devices on more than one platform. They’re now working on a new iteration of their products that allows users to use one license to access the app on multiple platforms.

2. Be flexible with your monetization strategy.

MobiSystem’s early users were accustomed to only one type of app monetization model from business apps – paying for access to premium versions. As consumer apps became successful with new models, the MobiSystems team was eager to adopt new monetization features in Android.

Since profiting from in-app purchases was a business model they could easily adopt, they decided to offer a version of their app for free with an in-app subscription to gain access to premium features. They saw a huge spike in downloads but some initial decline in revenues.To solve this, they turned to a monetization model that business apps never tried before—in-app advertising.

Transitioning to ads did take some time, but worked out positively. By starting slowly, experimenting with placement, being committed to showing high quality ads, and being clear that ads were critical in supporting their free version, MobiSystem bridged their revenue gap and built a successful business. Best of all, they’re able to sustainably offer a useful app for free. One of their products, OfficeSuite, has over 100,000 daily installs and has been consistently on the top free apps list in the the Play Store’s business categories.

When considering your app’s monetization strategy, consider all of your options thoroughly. There may be potential to use business models that are unusual in your space.

We hope you enjoyed the tips from MobiSystems. If you found this information helpful, don’t forget to check out The No-nonsense Guide to App Monetization. Also, stay connected on all things AdMob by following their Twitter and Google+ pages and be sure to connect with MobiSystems on Twitter here.

Categories: Programming

Introducing a new developer show "Machine Learning: Recipes for New Developers"

Wed, 03/30/2016 - 18:34

Posted by Josh Gordon, Developer Advocate

To help you get started building applications with machine learning, we’re excited to launch a new developer show, Machine Learning: Recipes for New Developers. In the first few episodes, we’ll teach you the ropes of machine learning without requiring any major prerequisites (like calculus). As the series progresses, we’ll walk you from “Hello World” to solving some real world problems.

Episodes will generally publish bi-weekly, and be only about 5-10 minutes in length to keep the material lightweight. Occasionally, we’ll have guests on the show who work with machine learning on different teams around Google.

Ep #1: Hello World.

  • Six lines of Python is all it takes to write your first machine learning program! In this episode, we'll briefly introduce what machine learning is and why it's important. Then, we'll follow a recipe for supervised learning (a technique to create a classifier from examples) and code it up.

Also: Coffee with a Googler came to NYC! Laurence and Josh talk about the importance of machine learning for developers, and reducing barriers to machine learning education. Check out the video!

Categories: Programming

Introducing VR view: embed immersive content into your apps and websites

Wed, 03/30/2016 - 17:01

Posted by Nathan Martz, Product Manager

Travel apps may include turtle photos, but they're nothing like diving into the open ocean. Real estate websites may include descriptions of the dining room, but it's nothing like actually touring the home. For developers, having immersive elements in their apps and websites can be the difference between meh and magical. That's why we're introducing VR view—a quick and easy way to embed immersive content on Android, iOS and the web.

VR views take 360 VR images or videos and transform them into interactive experiences that users can view on their phone, with a Cardboard viewer, or on their desktop computer. For native apps, you can embed a VR view by grabbing the latest Cardboard SDK for Android or iOS* and adding a few lines of code. On the web, embedding a VR view is as simple as adding an iframe on your site. We’re open-sourcing the HTML and JavaScript for web developers on github, so you can self-host and modify it to match your needs.

From travel and real estate to news and entertainment, we hope embeddable VR views make it quick and easy to share your story and build immersive and engaging visual experiences your users will love. We're excited to see what you create.

*Yes, you read that right! Starting today, there’ll be a native Cardboard SDK for iOS. Provided in idiomatic Objective C, and packaged as a single, easy-to-use CocoaPod, this new SDK includes all of the features already available in the Cardboard SDK for Android.

function DeviceMotionSender(){if(!this.isIOS_()){return}window.addEventListener("devicemotion",this.onDeviceMotion_.bind(this),false);this.iframes=document.querySelectorAll("iframe.vrview")}DeviceMotionSender.prototype.onDeviceMotion_=function(e){var message={type:"DeviceMotion",deviceMotionEvent:this.cloneDeviceMotionEvent_(e)};for(var i=0;i
Categories: Programming

Introducing the Google API Console

Thu, 03/24/2016 - 23:25

Posted by Israel Shalom, Product Manager

Every day, hundreds of thousands of developers send millions of requests to Google APIs, from Maps to YouTube. Thousands of developers visit the console for credentials, quota, and more -- and we want to give them a better and more streamlined experience.

Starting today, we’ll gradually roll out the API Console at console.developers.google.com focusing entirely on your Google API experience. There, you’ll find a significantly cleaner, simpler interface: instead of 20+ sections in the navigation bar, you’ll see API Manager, Billing and Permissions only:

Figure 1: API Console home page

Figure 2: Navigation section for API Console

console.cloud.google.com will remain unchanged. It’ll point to Cloud console, which includes the entire suite of Google Cloud Platform services, just like before. And while the two are different destinations, your underlying resources remain the same: projects created on Cloud Console will still be accessible on API Console, and vice versa.

The purpose of the new API Console is to let you complete common API-related tasks quickly. For instance, we know that once you enable an API in a new project, the next step is usually to create credentials. That’s why we’ve built the credentials wizard: a quick and convenient way for you to figure out what kind of credentials you need, and add them right after enabling an API:

Figure 3: After enabling an API, you’re prompted to go to Credentials

Figure 4: Credentials wizard

Over time, we will continue to tailor the API Console experience for the many developers out there who use Google’s APIs. So if you’re one of these users, we encourage you to try out API Console and use the feedback button to let us know what you think!

Categories: Programming

Register today for Google Code Jam

Wed, 03/23/2016 - 22:10

Posted by Chelsea Lax, Google Code Jam Team

Google Code Jam is here! Registration is now open for Google’s 13th annual algorithmic, global coding competition. And back for the second year is the Distributed Code Jam track, giving contestants even more ways to test their programming skills. This year, the competition is bigger than ever…

Join us for your chance to:

  • Compete at the 2016 World Finals held in New York, NY USA on August 5-6,

    • where 25 Code Jam Finalists will compete for the $15,000 grand prize,

    • and 15 Distributed Code Jam finalists will compete for the $5,000 grand prize;

  • Win a limited edition Code Jam T-Shirt;

  • Take home the titles of Code Jam and Distributed Code Jam Champion!

Registration will be open until the close of the first online round. The Online Qualification Round will take place on April 8 @ 23:00 UTC. Visit g.co/codejam to learn more.

Are you up for the challenge? Register today at g.co/codejam.

Categories: Programming

Learn about Android for Work over Coffee with Janice Wong

Fri, 03/18/2016 - 21:30

Posted by Laurence Moroney, Developer Advocate

Android for Work balances an IT admin’s need for security with the needs of users for simplicity, making your favorite smartphone or tablet a great business tool. Laurence meets with Android for Work Product Manager Janice Wong to catch up with what’s latest and greatest in the Android for Work space, and how developers can get started with developing Business Apps.

Over the past few years, Android has become a reliable mobile platform for the enterprise. Janice describes her role in unleashing Android for the workplace and providing users more choice over their devices. Janice shares about her passion for productivity in the workplace, including work that she’s done on apps, for example working with mobile versions of popular enterprise email and calendaring applications. To learn more about where you can get started with developing, visit http://developer.android.com/work.

Categories: Programming

Designing for Mobile Micro-Moments

Wed, 03/16/2016 - 21:26

Posted by Jenny Gove, UX Research Lead, Google

Mobile has shaped the way users interact with businesses and brands alike. Nowadays, businesses cannot simply replicate their desktop strategy on mobile; they need to re-think how to build mobile experiences that are useful for clients in their moments of need - those I-want-to-know, I-want-to-go, I-want-to-do, and I-want-to-buy moments throughout the day.

To help app and mobile site developers learn what comprises a best-in-class mobile experience, we’re launching a new mobile design hub on Think with Google: Designing for Mobile Micro-Moments. The new hub features in-depth research on exactly what people expect from a mobile experience.

Learn what makes a best in class mobile experience

We partnered with AnswerLab to run user studies with more than 100 people, where we tested user's behavior on more than 100 different apps and mobile sites to undercover what led to a seamless experience and what design experiences were problematic or caused frustration to users. The results are two new sets of UX principles with specific recommendations to help you improve your mobile experience and drive conversions:

Start building better mobile sites and apps today

After you’ve identified how to improve your mobile experience, you can find tools and resources to start making improvements. Here are just a few of the resources that are available on the hub:

  • For mobile sites, consider using the latest technologies to create an Accelerated Mobile Page. This dramatically improves the performance of the mobile web and allows rich content to load instantaneously for a speedy, delightful experience.
  • Research shows that the bounce rate can be as high as 58% for web pages that take nearly ten seconds to load. Check Pagespeed Insights to gauge your mobile site’s speed.
  • Building a native app? Take advantage of Google API and Services to simplify development, grow and engage your user base, and earn money.
  • Improve the look and feel of your mobile site and app with Material Design.

Learn More

Visit the Designing for Mobile Micro-Moments hub on Think with Google to view the studies and get additional resources to start developing and marketing great mobile sites and apps.

Categories: Programming

Designing for Mobile Micro-Moments

Wed, 03/16/2016 - 21:26

Posted by Jenny Gove, UX Research Lead, Google

Mobile has shaped the way users interact with businesses and brands alike. Nowadays, businesses cannot simply replicate their desktop strategy on mobile; they need to re-think how to build mobile experiences that are useful for clients in their moments of need - those I-want-to-know, I-want-to-go, I-want-to-do, and I-want-to-buy moments throughout the day.

To help app and mobile site developers learn what comprises a best-in-class mobile experience, we’re launching a new mobile design hub on Think with Google: Designing for Mobile Micro-Moments. The new hub features in-depth research on exactly what people expect from a mobile experience.

Learn what makes a best in class mobile experience

We partnered with AnswerLab to run user studies with more than 100 people, where we tested user's behavior on more than 100 different apps and mobile sites to undercover what led to a seamless experience and what design experiences were problematic or caused frustration to users. The results are two new sets of UX principles with specific recommendations to help you improve your mobile experience and drive conversions:

Start building better mobile sites and apps today

After you’ve identified how to improve your mobile experience, you can find tools and resources to start making improvements. Here are just a few of the resources that are available on the hub:

  • For mobile sites, consider using the latest technologies to create an Accelerated Mobile Page. This dramatically improves the performance of the mobile web and allows rich content to load instantaneously for a speedy, delightful experience.
  • Research shows that the bounce rate can be as high as 58% for web pages that take nearly ten seconds to load. Check Pagespeed Insights to gauge your mobile site’s speed.
  • Building a native app? Take advantage of Google API and Services to simplify development, grow and engage your user base, and earn money.
  • Improve the look and feel of your mobile site and app with Material Design.

Learn More

Visit the Designing for Mobile Micro-Moments hub on Think with Google to view the studies and get additional resources to start developing and marketing great mobile sites and apps.

Categories: Programming

Student applications now open for Google Summer of Code!

Tue, 03/15/2016 - 21:46

Posted by Mary Radomile, Google Open Source team

Are you a university student looking to learn more about open source software development? Look no further than Google Summer of Code (GSoC) and spend your summer break working on an exciting open source project, learning how to write code.

For twelve years running, GSoC gives participants a chance to work on an open source software project entirely online. Students, who receive a stipend for their successful contributions, are paired with mentors who can help address technical questions and concerns throughout the program. Former GSoC participants have told us that the real-world experience they’ve gained during the program has not only sharpened their technical skills, but has also boosted their confidence, broadened their professional network and enhanced their resumes.

Students who are interested can submit proposals on the program site now through Friday, March 25 at 19:00 UTC. The first step is to review the 180 open source projects and find project ideas that appeal to you. Since spots are limited, we recommend a strong project proposal to help increase your chances of selection. Our Student Manual provides lots of helpful advice to get you started on choosing an organization and crafting a great application.

For ongoing information throughout the application period and beyond, see the Google Open Source Blog, join our Google Summer of Code discussion lists or join us on internet relay chat (IRC) at #gsoc on Freenode.

Good luck to all the open source coders out there, and remember to submit your proposals early — you only have until Friday, March 25 at 19:00 UTC to apply!

Categories: Programming

Become a Highly Productive Web Developer with Udacity

Tue, 03/15/2016 - 17:21

Posted by Paul Bakaus, Web Developer Advocate at Google

There’s a lot to learn when you start to become a web developer. What’s often forgotten though is that the best web developers don’t just know the right JavaScript APIs and frameworks and the mysteries of CSS, but have access to a myriad of tools that dramatically increase their every-day productivity.

In the recently launched Web Tooling & Automation course at Udacity, we’re giving you access to information that most other developers have been learning gradually on the side, so you can kickstart your developer life.

Regardless of whether you’re just beginning your career or whether you want to refresh your picture of the productivity tools landscape, head over to Udacity to learn about setting up your editor, creating powerful build scripts, live editing, linting and all other sorts of awesome optimizations.

Categories: Programming

Become a Highly Productive Web Developer with Udacity

Tue, 03/15/2016 - 17:21

Posted by Paul Bakaus, Web Developer Advocate at Google

There’s a lot to learn when you start to become a web developer. What’s often forgotten though is that the best web developers don’t just know the right JavaScript APIs and frameworks and the mysteries of CSS, but have access to a myriad of tools that dramatically increase their every-day productivity.

In the recently launched Web Tooling & Automation course at Udacity, we’re giving you access to information that most other developers have been learning gradually on the side, so you can kickstart your developer life.

Regardless of whether you’re just beginning your career or whether you want to refresh your picture of the productivity tools landscape, head over to Udacity to learn about setting up your editor, creating powerful build scripts, live editing, linting and all other sorts of awesome optimizations.

Categories: Programming

We’ve got a new URL!

Mon, 03/14/2016 - 21:29
You may have noticed the Google Developers Blog has a new domain: developers.googleblog.com. That’s because starting today, Google is moving its blogs to a new domain to help people recognize when they’re reading an official blog from Google. These changes will roll out to all of Google’s blogs over time. The previous address will redirect to the new domain, so your bookmarks and links will continue to work. Unfortunately, as with a custom domain change in Blogger, the Google+ comments on the blogs have been reset. Thanks as always for reading—we’ll see you here again soon at developers.googleblog.com!
Categories: Programming